Boeing Boeing

Venue : Woodrush High School

Date : May 1975

Genre : Comedy

Director

Ted Pedvin
Director

Cast

Gerry Solomon
Bernard

Val Evans
Jenet

Val Archer

Val Archer
Bertha

Frank Winter
Robert

Pam Davey
Jacqueline

Willa Hislop
Judith

Crew

Ivan Castle
Stage Manager

Bob Aldridge
Assistant Stage Manager

no profile image

Paul Jenkins
Assistant Stage Manager

Irene Price
Assistant Stage Manager

Gerry Smith
Assistant Stage Manager

no profile image

George Cope
Lighting

Sybil Parr
Properties

Jack Parramore
Properties

Phil Lett
Front of House

Ken Gibbons
Set Design

Crew

Ivan Castle
Stage Manager

Bob Aldridge
Assistant Stage Manager

Paul Jenkins
Assistant Stage Manager

Irene Price
Assistant Stage Manager

Gerry Smith
Assistant Stage Manager

George Cope
Lighting

Sybil Parr
Properties

Jack Parramore
Properties

Phil Lett
Front of House

Ken Gibbons
Set Design

Production Gallery

Production Reviews

Wythall play has smooth take-off in hilarious farce

Mare Camoletti’s farce “Boeing Boeing” has all the ingredients of a winner and given the first-class treatment of Wythall Dramatic Society, it could not fail to fly high.

The Wythall players are undoubtedly at their very best in comedy and the production, staged for three nights of Woodrush High School, literally sparkled from beginning to end.

The story of a flirtatious “Romeo” who is engaged to three air-hostages simultaneously, depends on the speed of its action and the actors rose to the occasion brilliantly. They got off to a flying start and the pace never slackened throughout the three rollicking acts.

Heading the cast was Gerry Solomon giving one of his most exhuberant performances as Bernard who entertained his lady loves on a rota basis, while Frank Winter gave superiative support as Robert, the friend who ‘dropped in’ to the uproarious tangle.

Delightful as the girls were Pam Davey, Willa Hislop and Val Evans. All three looked charming and handled their roles with confidence, polish and an excellent sense of timing.

Completing the company was Val Archer who gave a perfect portrayed of Bertha, the long-suffering house-keeper.

One of the most outstanding features of the production was the way in which the six characters worked as a team, complementing one another and each earning a plentiful share of the laughs.

One got the impression that they were thoroughly enjoying themselves and this atmosphere of fun inevitably communicated itself to everyone in the hall.

Hilarious situations well staged, witty dialogue crisply delivered and never a single line forgotten or ‘fluffed’, all this combined to give a show which did great credit to producer Ted Pedvin.

It was no wonder that a member of the audience was heard to say that it equalled any professional production.

Reviewer Unknown, Local Redditch Paper


'Boeing' now all set for take-off

A Birmingham production of the play 'Boeing Boeing' is now ready for take-off - with three leading ladies now fully clothed.

For several weeks Wythall Dramatic Society feared the play would not be able to take-off as several leading arline companies refused to lend costumes to the actresses playing air hostesses.

This was because the airlines felt the play - a comedy about the antics of a man with different airline hostess girl friends all hopping off planes at different times - gave their employees a bad reputation.

By Mr. Philip Letts, Secretary of Wythall Dramatic Society said today: "Members of the cast have made the costumes themselves - and identified the different airline companies are man-made badges."

"The identification is necessary as the actual airline companies are mentioned in the play."

"So with or without the co-operation of the airlines the show is ready to start this Thursday at Woodrush High School in Hollywood, Birmingham."

Evening Mail Reporter, Birmingham Evening Mail


Leading Ladies 'in a spin'.

Three leading ladies in a Birmingham play are ready for takeoff in their production of the play "Boeing Boeing" except they have no appropriate clothes to wear.

And that's because leading airline companies have declined to help clothe these would-be air hostesses.

Mr. Philip Letts, secretary of Wythall Dramatic Society , said: 'Boeing Boeing' is a comedy play about the antics of a man with different airline hostess girl friends all hopping off planes at different times." "The theatre group needed airline hostesses' costumes but the airlines refused to help because they felt the play gives their girls a bad reputation."

So, with less than a week to go before the play open at Woodrush High School in Hollywood, Birmingham, there are three actresses still hoping to be able to wear something appropriate for the occasion.

Lisa Wood, Local Paper, 1975