Memory of Water

Venue : Redditch Palace Theatre

Date : May 2004

Genre : Comedy

Director

Mike Beamish
Director

Peter Round
Assistant Director

Cast

Crew

Beccy Key
Stage Manager

Beccy Key
Lighting Design

Roger Warren
Effects

Val Archer

Val Archer
Properties

Anne Cherry
Properties

Beryl Linforth
Properties

Jenny Theakston
Properties

John Nolan
Set Design

John Parkes
Set Design

Abby Stonehall
Photography

Crew

Beccy Key
Stage Manager

Beccy Key
Lighting Design

Roger Warren
Effects

Val Archer
Properties

Anne Cherry
Properties

Beryl Linforth
Properties

Jenny Theakston
Properties

John Nolan
Set Design

John Parkes
Set Design

Abby Stonehall
Photography

Production Gallery

Production Reviews

Sisters of no mercy

A play about three “highly dysfunctional” siblings returning home for their mother’s funeral is Wythall Theatre Company’s latest production at the Palace Theatre.

The Memory of Water by Shelagh Stephenson is an award winning comedy which charts how the sisters come to terms with the death of their mother.

To complicate matters, none of them get along with each other and each has their own perspective and interpretation of their childhood memories, which produces some “uproariously funny and sometimes unsettling scenarios.”

The sisters, played by Liz Round, Sue Lister and Denise Bishop, are all very different and constantly bicker over their conflicting memories.

A spokesman said: “Teresa is the martyred caregiver who resents her sisters for abandoning her with a woman in the throes of Alzheimer’s.”

“Mary is the classic overachiever in a crisis who has reached the point where she’s researching the point where she’s researching neural disorders during the funeral arrangements and the prodigal daughter Catherine is a drugged-out, self-absorbed shopaholic and motor-mouth who is in fact a lonely child, slightly lost and desperate for affection.”

The play contains strong language and is recommended for those aged 16 and over.
Shelagh Stephenson’s award winning comedy The Memory of Water is staged by Wythall Theatre Company at the Palace Theatre in Redditch next week (Wednesday to Saturday, May 19 to 22).

Memory is the theme running through a play about three sisters who return home to the north of England for their mother’s funeral. The ebb and flow of emotion, and the ever-changing alliances between the sisters as they try to come to terms with each other and their loss, is a story as old as life itself.

Each sister holds distinct memories of their collective childhoods, and each has her own perspective and interpretation of what these memories mean.

The way these dysfunctional siblings deal with the death of their mother, with whom none of them really got along, produces some funny and yet sometimes unsettling scenarios.

Teresa is the martyred carer who present her sisters for abandoning her with a woman in the throes of Alzheimer’s.

Mary is the classic over-achiever in a crisis who has reached the point where she’s researching neural disorders during the funeral arrangements.

And prodigal daughter Catherine is a drugged out, self-absorbed shopaholic and motor mouth who is in fact a lonely child, slightly lost and desperate for affection.

Lynda Morrison (May 2004), Redditch Advertiser


An award-winning comedy

Shelagh Stephenson’s award winning comedy The Memory of Water is staged by Wythall Theatre Company at the Palace Theatre in Redditch next week (Wednesday to Saturday, May 19 to 22).

Memory is the theme running through a play about three sisters who return home to the north of England for their mother’s funeral. The ebb and flow of emotion, and the ever-changing alliances between the sisters as they try to come to terms with each other and their loss, is a story as old as life itself.

Each sister holds distinct memories of their collective childhoods, and each has her own perspective and interpretation of what these memories mean.

The way these dysfunctional siblings deal with the death of their mother, with whom none of them really got along, produces some funny and yet sometimes unsettling scenarios.

Teresa is the martyred carer who present her sisters for abandoning her with a woman in the throes of Alzheimer’s.

Mary is the classic over-achiever in a crisis who has reached the point where she’s researching neural disorders during the funeral arrangements.

And prodigal daughter Catherine is a drugged out, self-absorbed shopaholic and motor mouth who is in fact a lonely child, slightly lost and desperate for affection.

Unkown, The Standard 14/05/2004


A Family Affair

A STRONG company deserved much better than the poor house it attracted on the first night of Shelagh Stephenson’s tale of three sisters – and the men in the lives of two of them – as they prepare for their mother’s funeral.

Joy Rodgers, playing the spirit of the departed mother, needs to vary her studies and predictable delivery in the wake of a death that offers each of the sisters a high spot of introspection or a chance to examine her relationships.

Denise Bishop (Mary) and Elizabeth Round (Catherine) both carry it off with aplomb – but special marks go to Sue Lister (Terresa) for her vociferous interlude with a whisky bottle.
Adam Lee (Mike) is a likeable diffident at discovering the nature of the family into which he is being drawn, and Ken Stonehall (Frank) handles his comic opportunities well. Mike Beamish’s attractive production continues until Saturday.

John Slim, Evening Mail, Friday 21st of May