Murdered to Death

Venue : Kingsley College Theatre

Date : June 2011

Genre : Murder Mystery

Director

Peter Round

Director

Jason Trombley

Assistant Director

Cast

Joy Rodgers

Mildred

Elizabeth Round

Dorothy

Ted Rodgers

Bunting (the Butler)

Peter Round

Bunting (understudy)

Mike Beamish

Colonel Charles Craddock

Sue George

Margaret Craddock (wife)

Adam Lee

Pierre Marceau, French art dealer

Alison Trombley

Elizabeth Hartley-Trumpingthon

Estelle Shutkever

Joan Maple

Ed Parrott

Inspector Pratt

Simon Brown

Constable Thompkins

Crew

Martin Alderton

Stage Manager

Jo Key

Sound Effects

Marcus Bridger

Programme

Joy Rodgers

Costume

Jason Trombley

Set Construction

Adam Lee

Set Construction

Peter Round

Set Construction

Val Archer

Val Archer

Properties

Beryl Linforth

Properties

John Parkes

Front of House

Sarah Thomson

Properties

Alison Spencer

Properties

Crew

Martin Alderton

Stage Manager

Jo Key

Sound Effects

Marcus Bridger

Programme

Joy Rodgers

Costume

Jason Trombley

Set Construction

Adam Lee

Set Construction

Peter Round

Set Construction

Val Archer

Properties

Beryl Linforth

Properties

John Parkes

Front of House

Sarah Thomson

Properties

Alison Spencer

Properties

Production Gallery

Reviews

Murdered to Death – Review

I have come to expect a very high standard from the Wythall Theatre Company and I was not let down in their recent spoof Agatha Christie play ‘Murdered to Death’.

The immaculate set was an excellent back drop for this 1930’s murder mystery with Joy Rodgers as Mildred, delivering a delightful performance as the host of a weekend party at her county pile, assisted by her niece Dorothy and hindered by her bumbling and sometime drunken butler Bunting, played by Peter Round whose exceptional comic timing made Bunting a joy to watch.

Having discovered that her Aunt Mildred has been duped into buying some dubious artwork by French art dealer Pierre Marceau, played with characteristic enthusiasm by Adam Lee, Dorothy, performed persuasively by Elizabeth Round, sets about a spot of blackmail to teach Pierre a lesson, but things are, of course, not what they seem. The other house guests, Colonel Charles and Margaret Craddock, played larger than life by Mike Beamish and Sue Lister, and Alison Bond’s wonderfully pompous Elizabeth Hartley-Trumpington all have agendas of their own.

When local sleuth Miss Maple arrives, played with exceptional aplomb by Estelle Shutkever, you know someone is going to get murdered, and it doesn’t take very long.

Dressed in classic shabby mac, Ed Parrott gave an impressive performance of the inept Inspector Pratt who, arriving on the scene with his assistant, Constable Thompkins, makes wildly inaccurate assumptions and whilst re-enacting the murder only succeeds in shooting poor Thompkins in the foot. Simon Brown, playing the long suffering Thompkins with great solemnity, gives the impression of being the only one who has any real grasp on what is going on.

This fast moving comedy contains every clichés possible. Several shootings later and everyone has a motive, did the butler do it?

Director Peter Round should be very proud of this show, the audience laughed throughout and the performers were all, without exception, well rehearsed, well cast and well…. mostly guilty!

Roger Green, WTC Website